Money will help make NHS flexible employer

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Health authorities will receive cash to implement the Government’s Improving Working Lives standard, which promotes flexible working and employee-friendly practices in the NHS.Only NHS trusts are currently eligible to receive £25,000 from the Government to implement the standard, which is designed to make the NHS the employer of choice in the UK.At a conference in Birmingham last week, David Amos, head of NHS employment policy, said, “In the past, money was ring-fenced for each organisation, but now it will be spread across the NHS.”AHHRM president Sally Storey said the extra money would help trusts solve the dilemma between spending more on staff pay and introducing flexible practices. Trusts have been able to spend money on paying for childcare coordinators and introducing childcare schemes, she explained. She said, “Where we are situated in Chertsey there is not a lot for staff to do outside work hours. This will allow them to improve their social lives with their colleagues and is part of our recruitment and retention strategy.”· Hugh Taylor, HR director for the NHS Executive, has announced that he will be stepping down from his post. He will become NHS director of corporate affairs, working closely with Nigel Crisp, chief executive of the Department of Health. Money will help make NHS flexible employerOn 16 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Speaking up in defence of NVQs

first_imgIshould like to speak out in defence of NVQs. They are too often seen aslow-level qualifications undertaken by put-upon school leavers in anenvironment where credibility means the highest number of students“successfully” through the system. This image fails to reflect their benefitsand flexibility.Thequalifications fully recognise current experience and demonstrate theapplication of actual skills and knowledge in a working environment. They can actas powerful work-based training plans, and assist in monitoring progress aswell as achievement. Because they are work-based qualifications, employers,colleges and independent training providers can act as the approved andregulated assessment centre. Increasingly,at all levels in the construction industry, NVQs are seen as a measure of askilled workforce by prospective clients.ShepherdCorporate Services has been involved with higher-level construction-occupationNVQs since their introduction in the early 1990s. This has been both thetraining division of a national contractor, and also a training provider andNVQ assessment centre in its own right. As a result, Shepherd Construction hasseen the benefits of using these NVQs as part of its formal developmentprogrammes for supervisors at level 3 and managers at level 4. The measurableeffectiveness of this approach earned Shepherd a national training award in1998.Furtherincreasing the credibility of NVQs within the construction industry, the CharteredInstitute of Building (CIOB) has become the first professional body within theindustry to fully recognise for membership the personal achievement of an NVQ5in Construction Contracts Management. As with all NVQs at level 5, the standardof this is broadly equivalent to professional/postgraduate level. ShepherdCorporate Services assesses this qualification for experienced people fromorganisations such as Bovis Lend Lease that wish to demonstrate theiroccupational competence.Outsidethe construction industry, the Chartered Institute of Purchasing has alsoaccepted specified NVQs into its membership structure. It is to be hoped thatthis increased acceptance of NVQs will give the qualifications, and those whoachieve them, the credibility they deserve.By,Julie Sykes, assessment centre co-ordinator, Shepherd Corporate Services Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Speaking up in defence of NVQsOn 1 Feb 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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News

first_imgNewsOn 1 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today This month’s newsSkin care booklets The Health & Safety Executive has published three guidance booklets onassessing and managing risks from exposure of skin to chemical agents. They areavailable on 08701 545500. www.hsebooks.co.ukSafety roadshows A series of roadshows to raise awareness about the need for correct personalprotective equipment are being run by the Health & Safety Executive and theBritish Occupational Hygiene Society from April. They will tour the countrycalling at London, Glasgow, Cardiff, Preston and Sheffield.  www.hse.gov.ukExposure limits The Health & Safety Executive has approved an updated list ofoccupational exposure limits which will be published in early May. The newlimits will take effect from December. A consultation process has also begunthrough the Health & Safety Commission. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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News in brief

first_img Previous Article Next Article This month’s news in brief – FT CareerPoint has launched a series of animated training materialsavailable online. It also has psychometric testing available and furthere-learning facilities at http://ftcareerpoint.ft.com, where you can find linksto more information on studying for a degree online. – NETg has launched a series of e-learning solutions designed to providetraining on enterprise networking. They’ve been designed to offer ITprofessionals a single source of information on high speed networkingtechnologies, including B-ISDN, ATM and SMDS. – A recent survey by the seminal US-based Masie Centre found that 80 percent of respondents are willing to try e-learning. Of the 80 per cent ofrespondents, employees working in the training, sales, HR and marketing sectorswere most excited about participating in e-learning programmes. – Click2learn has signed a partnership deal with CSS to provide itslearning platform technology to multi-nationals and Russian organisations.”The Russian market for e-learning is huge and virtually untapped,”says Ruben Agababyan, general manager of CSS. “We have now entered a newera in which we can take advantage of cutting-edge technologies that haveevolved in Western Europe and the US.”   www.click2learn.com Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. News in briefOn 1 Nov 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Setting the right tone

first_imgEmployeesin the UK are becoming more familiar with their right to maintain dignity inthe working environment. But what exactly does this broad concept mean, andwhat should employers be doing about it? By Katie Jackson-Turner and Joe Glavina When an employee complains about his dignity at work – or more accuratelythe lack of it – the complaint usually relates to some kind of harassment orbullying. In general terms it is treatment the individual finds intimidating, hostile,offensive or disturbing. Usually it is meted out intentionally towards anindividual but it can, equally, be a complaint relating to an unpleasant andhostile working environment. For example, sexually explicit material which is now readily available tomany employees on the Internet can easily be downloaded and disseminated in theworkplace via e-mail or more conventional means. Such material could be sentdirectly to an individual or circulated indiscriminately. Either way it may formthe basis of a complaint for which the employer may be liable. There is, of course, a raft of equal opportunities legislation in the UKgeared to addressing the issue of dignity at work. It is unlawful for employersto treat a person less favourably on the grounds of his or her sex (SexDiscrimination Act 1975), race (Race Relations Act 1976) or disability(Disability Discrimination Act 1995). Indeed, there was even a specific pieceof legislation covering the subject – the Dignity at Work Bill – put togetherby the MSF Union in 1997 and steered by Lord Monkswell through the House ofLords in December 1997 and January 1998. Attempts to introduce the Bill intothe House of Commons, the first step before a Bill can become law, was blockedby John Major’s Conservative Government in February 1997. Shortly afterwards aGeneral Election was announced and the Dignity at Work Bill has been on holdever since. However, its failure to reach the statute books has not exactly left a holein this important area of social policy because it did little more than repeatand highlight existing measures on equal opportunities. One of the reasons for the significant increase in interest in this areaover recent years is the fact that there are no upper limits on awards madeunder any of the discrimination statutes. The removal of the cap oncompensation that can be awarded for discrimination claims has led to moreclaims being brought and has forced employers to take such claims moreseriously. Employees are increasingly aware of their right to dignity at work and aremore willing to take action. This is partly due to the media interest inhigh-profile cases and reports of compensation running to hundreds of thousandsof pounds. Harassment Although the word ‘harassment’ does not actually appear in any of theanti-discrimination legislation, the Acts state that it is unlawful todiscriminate against an employee by subjecting him or her to a detriment. It has been accepted by the courts that harassment, provided it is not particularlyminor, will constitute a detriment. So while cases occasionally turn on whetherthe harassment in question is sufficiently serious to amount to a detriment,normally the key question is whether it amounts to discrimination. For the reasons already mentioned, the number of discrimination claims beingbrought in the employment tribunals has been rising steadily and is set tocontinue. Harassment takes many forms, occurs on a variety of different grounds and canbe directed at one person or many people. An essential characteristic is thatit is unwanted by the recipient and that the recipient finds the conductoffensive or unacceptable. Conduct becomes harassment if it is persisted in once it has been made clearthat it is regarded by the recipient as offensive, although a single incidentmay amount to harassment if it is sufficiently serious. It is the unwantednature of the conduct that distinguishes harassment from friendly behaviourwhich is welcome and mutual. Employers’ defence All three discrimination Acts state that an employer is liable for anyunlawful discrimination carried out by its employees during the course of theiremployment, unless the employer can show that it has taken such steps as were reasonablypracticable to prevent those acts. Therefore, employers who do not try to prevent harassment taking place mayfind that they are liable for the damage done by a harassment campaign by oneof their employees. In most cases employers should be able to point to theirequal opportunities policy as good evidence of their attempts to combatharassment and other forms of discrimination. Certainly, there should be aprocedure in place for dealing with allegations of harassment. In some instances, tribunals have found dismissals to be unfair because theemployer did not follow its own procedure. There should be someone thatemployees can approach if they are being harassed and they should be able tofeel that any complaint they make will be dealt with fairly and promptly. Managers should be trained so that they can try to create a workingenvironment free from harassment. They should be able to recognise harassmentand they should know how to deal with the problem. Dignity – a broad concept Although harassment is perhaps the most obvious way a person’s dignity atwork might be undermined, dignity at work is a broad concept which includesareas such as the right to privacy and the right to respect for family life.These are new and developing areas of employment law and difficult foremployers to manage. Balancing the employee’s right to privacy against the employer’s need toensure that, for example, its e-mail and Internet facilities are not beingmisused is difficult. Legislation introduced in October last year (the Regulation of InvestigatoryPowers Act 2000, and associated Regulations) prohibits employers from snoopingor eavesdropping on their employees’ telephone conversations and e-mailexchanges unless in certain specific circumstances. In addition under the Human Rights Act 1998 we all have a right to privacy.While as a general rule, employees will not be able to sue their employerdirectly under the HRA, an employer who has breached any of the new ‘humanrights’ will have difficulty justifying its behaviour before an employmenttribunal. As a consequence, constructive dismissal claims which in the pasthave been difficult to bring successfully are more likely to succeed. Respect for family life was one of the themes that the Labour Party campaignedon in its election manifesto prior to being elected to Government. Since then we have seen the introduction of a host of new legislationdesigned to protect the right to respect for family life. For example, for thefirst time part-time workers, fathers who want to take parental leave, andparents or carers who need time off work to deal with domestic emergencies aredirectly protected by the law. In addition maternity rights have been extendedand will be further extended in the future. Personal injury In serious cases of harassment and/or bullying the victim may suffer eitherphysical or psychiatric injury. As the Court of Appeal has recently confirmed,in this type of case when an employment tribunal awards compensation for theunlawful discrimination (uncapped), it also has jurisdiction to award damagesfor both the physical and psychiatric injury that has been suffered. This is an attractive course of action for employees because it means thatthey are free to pursue compensation for their personal injuries without havingrecourse to the usual civil courts. This avoids the risk of having to pay theemployer’s costs in the event of the action proving unsuccessful. From the employer’s point of view there is an important practical point inrelation to settling claims of this type. When it comes to settling claims, itis common for employees’ advisers to ask for all personal injury claims to be”carved out” of the compromise agreement. However, there is no reason why personal injury claims of this type, broughton the back of a discrimination claim, cannot be settled. Katie Jackson-Turner and Joe Glavina are solicitors in the employmentdepartment of Addleshaw Booth & Co Dignity – European styleSince the election of the LabourGovernment the UK has become more willing to embrace European directivesdesigned to recognise and protect the right to dignity at work for allemployees of member states. Age discrimination in employment (December 2006),discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation, religion or belief (December2003) are to be barred by the new EU Equal Treatment Framework Directive whichrepresents the most important European discrimination legislation in the lastquarter of a century. The Directive states that harassment shall be deemed tobe a form of discrimination “when unwanted conduct … takes place withthe purpose or effect of violating the dignity of a person and (our emphasis)of creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensiveenvironment”. This is a more stringent test than currently applies under UKsex and race discrimination law, where only a showing of detrimental treatmentis required. It means that when the Directive is implemented, those complainingof harassment on the newly introduced grounds (sexual orientation, age orreligion) are likely to be better off bringing a complaint that they weresubjected to a detriment generally than by using any special provisionsrelating to harassment. Previous Article Next Article Setting the right toneOn 1 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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New rules threatening final salary schemes

first_img Previous Article Next Article New rules threatening final salary schemesOn 19 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Companies are increasingly likely to end their final salary pension schemesbecause of concerns over new accounting rules. A survey by the National Association of Pension Funds shows more thanthree-quarters of firms with final salary schemes are considering ending thembecause of the FRS17 accounting standard. The standard will require companies to show the assets or liabilities oftheir pension schemes in their internal accounts. NAPF chairman Peter Thompson said: “We have been warning for some timethat FRS17 would drive many employers from providing defined benefit pensions,and that is what is happening. “NAPF has always supported better disclosure of relevant information,and would welcome an accounting standard which reflects the long-term nature ofany pension promise. But bringing snap-shot accounting into the accounts of thesponsoring company will not only invite confusion among investors, but willlead firms to question whether it is worth their while continuing to offer agood quality final salary pension scheme.” Thompson said several final salary pension schemes have already closed tonew employees and, in some cases, to existing employees with FRS17 being citedas the main reason. NAPF called for the Accounting Standards Board to have a re-think on the wayFRS17 is being introduced to try and ease employers’ concerns. “On top of other pressures facing company pension scheme providers,FRS17 will too often prove the final straw which drives firms away fromoffering such schemes. In doing so, it will jeopardise the Government’s aim ofreversing the present 60 per cent state 40 per cent private split of pensionprovision and threaten the retirement incomes of thousands of tomorrow’spensioners,” said Thompson. www.napf.co.ukBy Ben Willmott Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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HR: Positive Resignation – How to hand in your notice

first_imgHR: Positive Resignation – How to hand in your noticeShared from missc on 8 Jan 2015 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Read full article Comments are closed.center_img A question that all HR/recruitment professionals get asked on at least a semi regular basis is: “How should I resign?”. The real answer is, there is no textbook answer as there are so many variables and moving parts involved relevant to e.g. company, manager, your professional style etc. but there are definitely a whole lot of wrong ways to do it. Here’s my 4 small tips that hopefully will offer some piece of mind during what in most cases is an awkward conversation (at best), and help it flow with a little more ease and hopefully avoid friction or burned bridges.Tip 1: No matter how much you might feel like it, don’t use the flaws of the company/manager as your reason for leaving. This is not the time or the place to have this conversation. My advice would be that if there is a burning desire inside you to offer some constructive criticism, do so at an exit interview in a rational and balanced manner. Instead use the positive points of why you have chosen to accept the new role as the reason for your departure.Tip 2: I’m firmly of the belief that we never stop learning and thus regardless of if you feel it has been the most fulfilling role or not, think of the lessons you’ve learned and thank your manager/company for the opportunity to have learned and grown as a professional.Tip 3: Unless extenuating circumstances dictate otherwise, wherever possible be willing to work your full contractual notice period. Make arrangements as such so as to make your transition out of the company as smooth as possible.Tip 4: If not already part of process, offer your time to have an “exit meeting/interview” with your line manager with the aim of trying to shed light on where in your opinion, the organisation could improve. This is where you can offer your CONSTRUCTIVE feedback and show that you are not harbouring any ill feelings due to some negative experiences but instead are aiming to offer your opinion to ensure other employees don’t feel the same thing.These are by no means complicated steps and is relatively “back to basics” kind of stuff but I hope it will give some piece of mind to anyone who may be looking for a little direction on ways to part ways in a positive light. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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CVS inks lease at 217 Broadway

first_img Email Address* broadwayRetailRetail Leasing Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Message* 217 Broadway (Google Maps, iStock)CVS is opening on Broadway — 217 Broadway, to be exact.The drug store chain has signed a 15-year lease for 19,350 square feet at the Astor Building, just south of City Hall. CVS will occupy 6,850 square feet on part of the ground floor and 12,500 square feet on the second floor.CBRE’s Bruce Surry, David LaPierre and Kristen Crossman represented the owner, Columbus Properties, in the deal. Ariel Schuster, Brandon Eisenman and T.J. Cholnoky of Newmark Retail represented CVS.As part of the deal, CVS is taking portions of the NY Sports Club and Staples.ADVERTISEMENTRead moreVaccine rollout is shot in arm for CVSCarlos Mattos’ family buys Hialeah assemblage for $8MJohn Jacob Astor: The making of a hard-nosed speculator “The retail space at the Astor Building offers amazing visibility with direct sight lines from One World Trade Center and the Fulton Transit Center and an incredible branding opportunity — flanked on either side by landmarks such as St. Paul’s Chapel and City Hall,” LaPierre said in a statement.Columbus Properties acquired the property in 1983 and made extensive renovations, adding a three-story penthouse. The Astor Hotel was built on the site by John Jacob Astor between 1832 and 1836.CVS has received a boost from the pandemic. It expects to administer more than 3 million vaccines in about 40,000 long-term facilities. At the same time, it is still shedding some underperforming stores as it opens new locations.Contact Sasha Jones Share via Shortlink Tags Full Name*last_img read more

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Kushner Real Estate, Stro to develop 200K-sf industrial building

first_img Message* 1150 McBride Avenue in Woodland Park, New Jersey, and Stro Companies president Steven Millstein (Google Maps, Stro)Kushner Real Estate Group and the Stro Companies have closed on a 16-acre property in Woodland Park, New Jersey, and have approval to build a large industrial building.Murray and Jonathan Kushner (Hollwich Kushner)Developing the 205,000 square-foot, Class A building will require demolishing a slightly larger structure on the site, 1150 McBride Avenue. Construction is to begin this summer and finish in the first quarter of next year.ADVERTISEMENT“We are extremely excited to be partnering on another great project with KRE,” said Jack Shulman, director of leasing, acquisitions and capital markets at Stro, in a statement. “Quality development sites in infill locations are extremely scarce.”The property — formerly home to Kearfott Guidance and Navigation — is located where Interstate 80 and Route 46 intersect.Read moreBig-box space in NJ converted, leased to grocery wholesalerElion Partners buys $30M industrial property in ElizabethNew Jersey industrial portfolio trades for $43M Tags Share via Shortlink DevelopmentIndustrial Real EstateNew Jerseytristate-weekly Kushner Real Estate, a property investment and management company based in Jersey City, was founded in 1979 by Eugene Schenkman and Murray Kushner, the brother of Kushner Companies co-founder Charles Kushner.United Realty’s John Friedland and Mark Tannen represented the seller in the transaction.The property is a sizable addition to the portfolios of both KRE and Stro.An aerial of the propertyKRE’s multi-family holdings exceed 9,000 existing apartments, with another 7,000 in various stages of approval and construction. The company also owns and managesmore 6 million square feet of office, warehouse and retail space.Stro, founded by Steven Millstein in 1994, has more than 30 properties, comprising approximately 2.5 million square feet.Contact Sasha Jones Email Address* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Full Name*last_img read more

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